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File: 1624528423586.png (1.1 MB, 720x1560, 6:13, Screenshot_20210624-022722.png) ImgOps iqdb

 No.58428[Reply]

Got two batches of beer brewing. Both are wheat malt, hops and cherries. Using wild yeast from cherries, hopefully Sacchoromyces. Malted the wheat myself (sprouted then dried in sun) and got cherries from my own cherry tree. I expect them to be sour beers but I'm not sure tasting them so far.

Right I started the 21st and left on 22nd. The left will probably fill with yeast cloud tomorrow and the cherries will float. The right one I only boiled until the wort changed color and smelled cause I just spontaneously made it after procrastinating after making the malt a couple months ago. I only had a fundamental understanding of brewing. The left one I boiled the hops for an hour and the malt a bit longer. That's why it isn't all the way full, too much boiled out. I'm probably gonna drink right after a week and left after a month or two.

Its pretty hot and sunny lately, tomorrow I'll start sprouting more grains I have and then malt them.

Gonna make mead soon. Reading the ancient way (which I trust more than modern ways - ignore modern schizo nonsense about sanitation, you don't need special soaps or airlocks), they used either years old rain water or boiled spring water. The yeast need nutrients beyond honey so I don't think I can just use tap water. My tap water in particular I know is soft (few minerals). I'm gonna age the mead at least 2-3 months.
38 posts and 8 image replies omitted. Click reply to view.

 No.60234

wiz capone and wiz luciano smuggling booze during 2020s prohibition, just need the other wizlansky from the gambling thread

 No.60235

>>60234
With authentic neo-flappers (probably female) wearing vegan fur.

 No.60261

File: 1638246290861.jpg (1.05 MB, 2610x4640, 9:16, IMG_20211129_232027.jpg) ImgOps iqdb

>>60219
Rice has mostly been liquefied, now I can pitch the yeast and let the fermentation begin.

 No.60273

File: 1638310843333.jpg (920.95 KB, 1749x3543, 583:1181, IMG_20211130_171934__01.jpg) ImgOps iqdb

>>60081
delicious mango

 No.60280

>>59304
this world is Hell



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 No.56997[Reply]

What are the most autistic hobbies? The most hardcore and obscure interests that a normalfag can never hope to penetrate? I don't mean retarded lolcow shit, but things that require study or have a technical bent. Pic related kind of, that's the sort of stuff I'm getting at.
52 posts and 8 image replies omitted. Click reply to view.

 No.60164

Anyone else into lone archery? No clubs just shooting arrows in the backyard or in the woods.

 No.60171

File: 1637380945860.jpg (390.25 KB, 900x602, 450:301, مرمی.jpg) ImgOps iqdb

>arabic calligraphy
>learning ancient/extinct languages
>writing poems-essays etc. in those said languages
>linguistic phonetics
>history of an extremely specific subject (like studying the migration of saka tribes into the indo-greek kingdom in hindu kush or whatever)
>strategy game modding

 No.60172

>>56997
Mathematics. This is the final answer. Mathematics is the most autistic hobby; in particular obscure branches of mathematics that, as of yet, appear to have no application to the real world.

 No.60174

>>60172
Mathematics has a lot of normies. Trust me, I did a master in mathematics.

 No.60278

I think my most obscure hobby is hex and counter wargaming.
Board Games have become quite hip but wargaming is a true exception. Imho even miniature wargaming ala gamesworkshop is still on the fringes, maybe people might know about it but not many play it. For hex and counter wargaming it is even worse. Currently dominated by bunch of boomers who still want to play with their favorite toys from 70s.
Many games are out of print or being reprinted by few companies who charge a lot because they cannot make a profit on volume. It has variety of themes and one can find anything from napoleonic warfare to ancient warfare.
But the most autistic of all hex counter wargames must be advanced squad leader, a squad based ww2 wargame. It is not that obscure within the hobby and even quite popular. But it is one of the most complex and detailed wargame out there the rules of it is absurdly long and you can simulate a variety of factors. Currently played by fat old boomers throughout anglosphere.



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 No.57193[Reply][Last 50 Posts]

Piss-off-your-mom-being-in-kitchen-all-day-and-not-cleaning edition

Last thread: >>26323

Recipe links:
http://ck.booru.org/index.php
http://www.wikihow.com/Category:Recipes
http://www.goodeatsfanpage.com/gefp/episodebyorder.htm
107 posts and 43 image replies omitted. Click reply to view.

 No.60244

>>60242
They are quite a bit of work to get edible so I see why they aren't eaten. Though in Korea they still make noodles and some sort of gelatin out of them.

 No.60274

>>60244
no way it's any more complicated than cashew farming. cashew workers are melting their hands and breathing in toxic fumes while harvesting and preparing them to eat

it would be cool to set up a huge funnel thing under oak trees so the acorns harvest themselves when they fall

 No.60275

>>60274
cashews are worth way more money though.

 No.60276

>>60274
It isn't the harvesting that is difficult it is the prepossessing to make them edible that is a pain in the ass.

They have a level of tannins in them that make them nearly uneatable until they are shelled, soaked/boiled with frequent water changes in a process that can take hours and stains the equipment used, drained, dried, roasted, then milled.
All for a product that isn't even close to worth all the effort, as the taste is meh and the texture is not all that good ether.

I have done it a few times both in the kitchen and in the woods and it is really not fun.

Oh, and you have to sort each nut individually if you don't want to deal with worms and fungus that are common with acorns. Both of which are the kind that will make you sick if you eat them.

It simply isn't cost effective to scale up the processing of acorn as there is rightfully little demand. Besides, it take a long time and a lot of space to grow a oak grove just to harvest acorns. Timber has a better return on investment.

 No.60277

>>60276
i think all that could be handwaved away if there was a market for acorns. if it was valuable enough i'm sure people would have created processing and sorting machines for it. there is just no reason to do any of that when no one cares about it


[Last 50 Posts]

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 No.41819[Reply][Last 50 Posts]

Favorite comic?

Favorite author?

Favorite cartoonist?

Favorite character?
182 posts and 64 image replies omitted. Click reply to view.

 No.59714

How many comics based on the works of Lovecraft or any other writer from Weird Tales exist? I know two good Argentinean adaptations, and I think there are a few adaptations of Clark Ashton Smith works in France. Even a Vathek with the fan fiction he wrote about Zulkaïs and Kalilah. Robert Howard had the best luck with comic adaptations. Just look at the bunch of conan comics

 No.59915

File: 1635872375872.png (3.48 MB, 1920x1080, 16:9, ClipboardImage.png) ImgOps iqdb

I had so much fun reading Super Sons, even managed to get a few laughs out of me. Wasn't expecting to be that good considering the main chars are two children, but it made me eat crow, it's well written and the childish aesthethic art synched perfectly with the comic.

 No.60265

>batman fear state event sucked ass
>x-men green was actively morally disgusting
Welp I am officially done with reading current mainstream comics. It's ether bad writing, forced politics at the expense of everything else, or more usually the case both.

 No.60271

>>60265
care to post some screenshots ?

 No.60272

>>60271
No I don't.


[Last 50 Posts]

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 No.57497[Reply][Last 50 Posts]

The last movie thread has reached the bump limit. Previous thread: >>54641
242 posts and 58 image replies omitted. Click reply to view.

 No.60266

>>60264
That has to be bait.

 No.60267

>>60266
To be fair he was drunk so that might explain his interpretation and post.

 No.60268

>>60266
>>60267
not sure what you're getting at, are you saying that I missed something?

 No.60269

>>60268
I don't know what they're going on about your post seemed normal to me.

 No.60270

>>60266
I loved Stalker and it seemed a reasonable view to me


[Last 50 Posts]

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 No.59356[Reply][Last 50 Posts]

All you need to begin drawing is a pencil and some paper

Feel free to post any drawings of yours in this thread. Illustration, doodle, traditional, digital - anything goes. Discussion on skillbuilding techniques and fair critique of other wizards' work is welcome.

last thread
>>54932
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 No.60184

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wasnt really good of a week practice wise, but the sky of #54 turned out pretty good. Decided to draw one of my 3 YuGiOh cards I bothered to keep, spent something like 5-7 hours on it. Neutral colours are such a nightmare to mix and match. Can you spot the 3 letters I oversaw and had to add them last minute?

 No.60231

>>60184
you can mix and apply color good enough

you just need to work on putting the color down accurately. so trace or do a sketch first and then use that as a guide for putting the color down

 No.60233

>>59878
Love it

 No.60243

File: 1638120824015-0.jpg (1.06 MB, 2635x1827, 2635:1827, 56.jpg) ImgOps iqdb

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Only managed 3 pictures this week where I have given up on the 3rd one. #56 looks like some elementary kid could've done a better job. While #57 has its fault - especially the lighting - I am really glad how that one turned out. I really like my tree. There are more nuances to it in reality than what you can see on the picture made with my smartphone so you have to trust me on that. I think I'm gonna seal it so I can keep it for the coming years. Nothing needs to be said for #58: I thought I challenge myself, challenged myself, failed and given up halfway through.

>>60231
Thanks for the feedback and praise, but unfortunately I am sketching beforehand. You can best notice it by Hiitas Staff or the fox's head.

 No.60262

>>60243
I love your art wiz, keep it up. It makes me happy


[Last 50 Posts]

 No.56436[Reply][Last 50 Posts]

A thread for those who enjoy and wish to discuss animation and animation related stuff from places that aren't Japan.
140 posts and 35 image replies omitted. Click reply to view.

 No.60145

>>60135
i like the porn one better
even the music was better

 No.60246


 No.60258

Its been bugging me how the OP for a thread specifically for "animation related stuff from places that aren't Japan." 2/3 images in it are from Japan.

 No.60259

>>60258
Japanese animation has been quite influential for decades, now.

 No.60260

>>60258
It was posted due to the content and point because it's talking about animation as a whole as a medium of expression.


[Last 50 Posts]

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 No.60032[Reply]

Book discussion.
Previous thread: >>54504

So it's been about a year since I read Arabian Nights (>>54901, >>54902) and last night I was staring at the ceiling before going to bed and out of nowhere felt like going through it again and started reading. Not sure why, I think it's because it turns out it's my favorite literary work out there. This was not obvious to me until very recently but it's becoming clearer now. Let's see how a second reading feels like. I feel like this book is everything I look for in literature. Weird fantasy, horror, mystery. It feels exotic and outlandish and you never follow the same people for long. You catch them at the turn of the tide, just before the angel of death comes for them. It races through this odd, tragic world at a steady pace, highlighting the shitshow that is humanity. Beasts, monsters, men and succubi who in their fear and ignorance become even more cruel and unpredictable than a Djinn. Ghouls feeding their young with the flesh of a young prince. Warm colors of a beautiful palace, where the powerful fill their stomachs with delicate pastries in a hurry, before their inevitable demise. The peaceful, lulling sounds of a gentle breeze in the desert. Dromedaries feeding on the flowers of an Acacia tree under a clear bright sky. Fishermen dreaming about rings of sorcery inside the belly of a blue tilapia. Forgotten ruins, forgotten, sleeping demons. I want to go back to those places again and when you read it, for a moment, you're there.

Also I got a warning for posting 'test' on the previous thread. Apologies, I wanted to check if it was still bumping and forgot to delete it.
6 posts and 2 image replies omitted. Click reply to view.

 No.60228

Does Wizards like goth literature? What would goth folks recommend besides Edgar Allan Poe?

 No.60229

>>60228
Idk what "goth" literature is but I totally adore gothic horror.
Is that what you mean?
If so I highly recommend reading the classics of the genre. While some of the modern stuff is quite good it just doesn't compare to the stuff that has stood the test of time.

 No.60236

File: 1638081722801.pdf (825.93 KB, Tropical Mainländer – Misa….pdf)


 No.60248

Recently I finished a book called Suttree, that I really liked. It's a hilarious book, something I didn't expect from the same guy who wrote Blood Meridian. A few days later I read The Screwtape Letters, since it's so brief and the prose isn't very dense, it's a really light and easy read.

I want to break next into The Technological Society by Jacques Ellul, before I do my annual re-read of The Satanic Verses. This year I've read almost all of Houllebecque's work, at least all of his novels that were translated into English.

I don't know what I'll read next, but by the time I do it'll be 2022. I guess I can decide then.

 No.60257

File: 1638237492733.png (687.52 KB, 567x936, 63:104, Chronica de El Rei D Pedro….png) ImgOps iqdb

I'm OP and I have to confess I dropped the Arabian Nights a couple of days after I started, getting just a little beyond Shahrazad'a frame story.
Instead I've been reading something quite different and I dare say quite rare indeed. In fact I don't think there's a translation of this in English at all, certainly not in its entirety and even in its native language this text is known by very few and read by even fewer.

I'm talking about Chronicle of king Peter I by Fernão Lopes, written around the 1430s. It's a very interesting text about two kings Peter, the Portuguese one and the Castilian one. Funny how the people chronicled here reminded me of the characters on the Arabian Nights. These kings are cruel and prone to violence. The Castilian Peter is perticularly perverse. The whole book is a long collection of people being terribly punished, hung, beheaded, shot, drowned, stabbed, clubbed, burnt and worse.

Yet there's a charm here, not only in the content but how Lopes tells us about those things. He uses a very personal, casual style and informs us about it in a very unceremoniously manner. I just was not expecting that from an official document from the 1400s.

Some of the events he tells us are quite memorable. There's this particular episode when the Castilian Peter uses caravels to transport his army in order to besiege a particular city. The siege doesn't go as planned and he orders every single man, including the sailors, to go ashore and help. Then at the evening a particularly strong wind pushes most of his caravels against the rocks and since no one was manning the fleet he loses most of it. Some he has to actually burn it down because he's afraid his enemy is going to be able to use them once he retreats. Lopes then casually informs us that some of those boats were from Genova and the Genovese sailors had to go back to their home on foot 'and they were very upset about it'. I imagine they were.

Also interesting is his sense of justice being nothing but the will to punish. He tells us several episodes where the Portuguese Peter goes out punishing adulterers, thieves and murderers. This guy liked to go around his kingdom, asking if there were any criminals to be punished that particular day and if there were he was quick carry out the punishment himself. Peter would have a cudgel on him at all times just in case the place he was visiting at the time had a criminal in need of a good beating. He also liked to wPost too long. Click here to view the full text.



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 No.43307[Reply]

For discussing software and hardware minimalism.

>What is computing minimalism?

http://www.linfo.org/unix_philosophy.html
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Unix_philosophy
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Minimalism_(computing)

>Why software minimalism?

- Fewer bugs
- Better performance
- Lower memory footprint
- Better maintainability
- Higher scalability
- Longer software lifetime
- Smaller attack surface

>List of minimal OSes and distros

>Obscure minimal
Plan 9, FreeDOS, Minix3, Genode
>Meme minimal
Post too long. Click here to view the full text.
49 posts and 3 image replies omitted. Click reply to view.

 No.58312

>>43307
OS: emacs
wm: EXWM
web browser: eww
file manager: dired
video/music player: N/A
image viewer: image-mode
text editor: evil
shell: eshell
terminal: ansi-term

 No.58336

File: 1623870004532.jpg (470.69 KB, 695x697, 695:697, gnu.jpg) ImgOps iqdb

>>58312
>video/music player: N/A
(defun mpv ()
  (interactive)
  (cl-flet ((play (this)
              (message (format "mpv %s" this))
              (start-process-shell-command "mpv" nil (format "mpv %s" this))))
    (let ((url (thing-at-point 'url))
          (file (thing-at-point 'filename)))
      (cond (url (play url))
            ((file-exists-p file) (play file))))))

 No.58337

I used this web browser called luakit several years back. It was pretty slick

 No.60240

Fedora Workstation user here, does anyone know a dnf command to remove packages that aren't dependencies of protected packages? My goal is to get to the bare minimum for the Distribution's standards and leave only the essentials for it to work, everything else will be flatpaks.
Currently I have tried this:
sudo dnf remove $(dnf list --installed | sed 1d | cut -d'.' -f1
but dnf complains about dnf, gnome-shell, grub2-efi-ia32, grub2-efi-x64, grub2-pc, grub2-tools-minimal, kernel-core, shim-ia32, shim-x64, sudo, systemd, systemd-udev which are protected packages, being removed, I don't want to have them (and its dependencies) removed.

Did any wizard ever bother writing a spell for this kind of situation?

 No.60245

>>58336
i want a gnu gf



 No.30554[Reply][Last 50 Posts]

I liked the first math thread, but that hit the bump limit so I'm making another one.

Here is a neat tool posted in the previous thread that shows you how to do geometry the way the greeks did.

https://sciencevsmagic.net/geo/

Here are a series of MIT OCW courses that will help you learn calculus:

https://ocw.mit.edu/courses/mathematics/18-01sc-single-variable-calculus-fall-2010/

https://ocw.mit.edu/courses/mathematics/18-02sc-multivariable-calculus-fall-2010/

Full MIT OCW Mathematics catalog:

https://ocw.mit.edu/courses/mathematics/

Attached is the a Numberphile video about the seven bridges of Königsberg because I dunno what else to attach to this OP.
245 posts and 55 image replies omitted. Click reply to view.

 No.60183

>>60180
Well, it's assumed that Gauss already knew about it since when Bolyai developed it and his father, Gauss's friend, sent a letter to Gauss to explain about his son's discovery and Gauss reply was not kind:
"To praise it would amount to praising myself. For the entire content of the work…coincides almost exactly with my own meditations which have occupied my mind for the past thirty or thirty-five years."
And that he already knew about it. Gauss was an arrogant person, btw, he didn't even wanted any of his sons to do mathematics because he knew they would never be better than him. Anyway, Lobachevsky is another person who developed non-euclidian geometry(around the same time as Bolyai) and it's believed that Gauss after learning Russian(at an old age), decided to read Lobachevsky's works which he became interested(it's said that he learned Russian to be able to read this very work, but I have read a russian paper that disagree with that and has valid arguments using Gauss's letters and journal).
Now, the interesting part is that by the time they accepted non-Euclidian Geometry, they realized that they have been using non-Euclidian Geometry for a long time in astronomy: Spherical Geometry. Which is why for hyperbolic Geometry we know who developed it: Bolyai and Lobachevsky; for Spherical Geometry, you are not going to find "the man who started it" since it has been developed since Ancient Greek, they just never realized it was non-Euclidean Geometry.

 No.60237

>>60183
ig it's complicated like everything in life
btw are you this guy >>51927?

 No.60238

>>60237
Nope, this >>60183 was my first post in this thread.

 No.60239

>>51927
>The need for calculus arose mainly because physicists wanted to explore the notion of instantaneous rates of change
Not really. Calculus was already studied way before this, the concept of the area under a graph and the tangent to a point in a graph were both studied for many years. It just so happens that it could also be studied for instantaneous rates of change because it turned out that "finding the tangent to a point" and "the average velocity at a time t as t goes to zero" are the same thing.
>Likewise Hilbert spaces (generalizations for euclidean spaces) were developed so that QM could work.
Hilbert Spaces existed way before QM, it makes no sense that "it was developed so that it would work for a field was not even born yet".

It's not that the universe is based from mathematics, it's that using mathematics is the best way to calculate our observations of the world. Many fields of mathematics were(and are) developed without any relation to the real world, until someone almost 2 centuries later found out he could use groups in QM too, for example.

>there isn't much of a point to theorems that aren't useful

This is flawed since you never know when something is useful. Maybe we shouldn't have studied non-Euclidean Geometry since Euclidean Geometry worked quite well and there was no use for non-Euclidean for a long time.

 No.60263

>>60239
I'm not an historian of mathematics, but I think your statement:
>Calculus was already studied way before this
only applies to integral calculus. As you pointed out, integral calculus (in a primitive form known as "the method of exhaustion") was already been studied by Eudoxus and Archimedes in ancient Greece, way before Newton and Leibniz. But before Newton and Leibniz, the problem of tangents was approached through very different and ad-hoc methods that have very little to do with our present-day notion of derivative. The idea of a difference quotient really is based on the definition of average velocity (the difference in the dependent variable represents distance, and it is divided by the difference in the independent variable that represents time) and as one takes the limit one obtains instantaneous velocity. It's really hard to deny that calculus was influenced by the study of the physical world. It is no coincidence that Newton worked both on calculus and physics.


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